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Although we are not able to meet in our new space yet (due to building work) I want to reach out to update you all:

As we embark on this new phase, I'm reminded of the whakatauki: "Ēhara tāku toa i te toa takatahi, engari he toa takitini." Our strength stems not from individual prowess, but from the collective efforts of many. Indeed, it has taken a village to breathe life into our vision!!!!


Moving premises is never easy, but amidst the challenges, the team and my motivation remains unwavering: we have listened to our community, our whānau voices as we have taken this step to develop a therapeutic hub of safety, hope and healing for those in our community experiencing current or historic intimate partner violence (IPV) for our tamariki – children, rangatahi – adolescents, our wāhine, and our community.

We have embarked on this remarkable journey—a journey of moving and yes, all the ‘normal’ whirlwind challenges this brings, the boxes, shelving, you name it is everywhere, but it will slowly evolve into a fabulous space! lol!!!! A time filled with smiles, some giggles, some of frustration (or possibly a lot!) but above all with aroha and an openness for moving forward.

This new space is a testament to continued commitment to creating a therapeutic environment of safety and healing, we are laying the foundation for a space that nurtures leanings, wellbeing in mind, body and wairau - spirit.


One of the most exciting aspects of our new location is the development of our therapeutic garden space. We have begun, albeit slowly by planting two kowhai trees—a symbol of the of the refuge movement. These trees stand as a tribute to the aroha and strength of the wāhine who have paved the way for us as we now move forward.


Reflecting on the past 3.5 years of my role I am filled with gratitude for the opportunity to lead this transformative journey. It's been a path of change, with invaluable lessons, always moving forward in a space of positive growth.


I extend my heartfelt appreciation to all of the team who continue to embrace our vision, our practicably perfect governance board of trustees 😊, and our fabulous community who continue to support us, through donations, or the wonderful GBB dropping of the beautiful baked treats, the incredible uni law students, our current crisis line volunteers, and to all of you offering their valuable time, and who extend their supports.


I invite everyone to join us on this journey as we continue to evolve and expand, and if you are interested in volunteering or know someone who is, to support our crisis line or contribute in various other ways, in lending a hand, please reach out to us at community@odwr.nz.


Together, let's cultivate a community where learning, healing, and resilience, flourish.


Ngā mihi.

 

 

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is maith an scéalaí an aimsir, time is a good storyteller...



There's a sentiment I often find myself saying, that is, I will retire only when I cease to learn!!! It's a reflection of my unwavering curiosity for knowledge. Knowledge gained in the most beautiful and every day unexpected moments, gifted by those who uplift us with manaakitanga, enlightenment and generosity of spirit, and also, at times, gifted to us in the form of obstacles, or moments created by those seeking to undermine or discourage.

Recently my curious mind asks, how do we continue to foster growth and learning when faced with adversity? Is it possible that during these times, the lessons we learn resonate more deeply within us, serving as poignant reminders of our resilience and capacity for growth? Is this the gift of learning through adversity?

In contemplating this, I find myself drawn to the concept of resilience. It's the inner strength that allows us to withstand adversity and emerge stronger. It's the ability to adapt, to learn, and to grow, even in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles.

So, how do we translate these lessons, these gifts, into our personal lives and our mahi? As someone fortunate to lead a service and a team who are dedicated to advocating, uplifting and supporting those in our community resilience is ever more important to reflect upon.

In our mahi, resilience serves as a constant reminder of our commitment to learn, to grow to understand, and most importantly be guided by the voices of whānau. To provide the space for continued leanings, not only my own, but that of my team,and our tangata whaiora/ clients. To allow not only our own innate insights but the wisdom of others, who stand beside us with wairua, those motivated by genuine intentions, driven by a shared purpose, with empathy, and who are devoid of ego.

In the end, it's not just about learning for the sake of learning. It's about using that knowledge to become better, to do better, and to create a brighter future for ourselves and those around us. Moreover, as we continually seek to learn through our own resilience, it equips us with the ability to respect the individual journeys of others, empowering them and instilling hope that they too can embark on a path of personal growth and learning

Mā te kimi ka kite, Mā te kite ka mōhio, Mā te mōhio ka mārama
Seek and discover. Discover and know. Know and become enlightened

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The amazing team at Rural Women New Zealand Otago/Southland have put together a kit of information which includes our Brochure.

RWNZ Members are the backbone of our connection with New Zealand’s rural communities.



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